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Ben Ormenese


 

  By Sast Report Correspondants

Kinetic artist Benito Ormenese, born 1930 in Prata di Pordenone, Italy, left the faculty of architecture in the 1960ies and moved to Milano to become an artist. Many of Ormenese's artworks are recognizable by the geometrical and three-dimensional aspects he incorporates into them. In addition, light and dynamics, as well as visual perception represent main themes in the design of his works of art. He often paints tessellated patterns, and likes using the colors black and white in many of his minimalistic artworks, also in combination with only a few other colors. When SAST REPORT met the tall-grown, gray-haired artist he seemed pensive, yet attentive. Ben Ormenese gave the impression that, as is typical for many artists, he does not like to talk about himself or even his art. He seems to prefer to place his works of art into the foreground.

 

video.GIF video: Some impressions of the opening of the art exhibition of Ben Ormenese.

 

Ben Ormenese
Ben Ormenese enjoying a glass of red wine
at the opening of his solo art exhibition.
He was stern but friendly and, uncommonly
gentle.
Background: right: Levitazione, 2004,
tecnica mista su tavola, 60 x 60 cm.
left: Fluttuazione, 2004.

Photo SAST REPORT

Ben Ormenese, Fluttuazione, 2004, tecnica mista su tavola, 60 x 60 cm.
Ben Ormenese, Fluttuazione, 2004,
tecnica mista su tavola, 60 x 60 cm.

Photo SAST REPORT

At the beginning of the 1960ies, Ben Ormenese started creating own translucent pastes through which his initially dark paintings turned more luminous and bright. He is an artist striving for orderliness in his works of art, always trying to perfect the themes light and dynamics, which form a characteristic feature. As from the middle of the sixties he begins with his acryl paintings which often show shiny lacquered surfaces. Ben Ormenese later started including the topic of visual perception in his artwork, placing for example lamellae, formed with cardboard, directly into the surface or into a wooden artwork, thereby creating three-dimensional objets d'art. He also tried to include or to establish a connection to the empty space around the artwork. During these years, lamellae, and other materials like wood and plexiglass, represent distinguished features of Ormenese's art, which in this early phase of his artistic career he exhibited mainly in Italy, and also in Spain.

 

 

 

Through the gallery owner Silvano Falchi in Milan, Ben Ormenese, from the beginning of the 1970ies, within only a few years, was able to show his work in various solo exhibitions in Italy and Germany, and in other exhibitions for example at the Royal Academy of Arts in London, as well as at modern art shows in Switzerland and Germany.
Then because of a personal crisis at the end of the 1970ies Ormenese one night burned many of his works of art. He returned to the region Friuli-Venezia Giulia. During the next twenty years he only seldom exhibited his work and dedicated himself to wood carving. For approximately three decades Ormenese essentially worked with wood, mostly changing its appearance by various different techniques, like for example lacquering. During the 1980ies and 1990ies he formed wooden architecturally inspired structures, initially abstract, but later his works evolved more into spacial sculptures.

 

Ben Ormenese, Fluttuazione, 2004, tecnica mista su tavola, 60 x 60 cm.
Ben Ormenese, Fluttuazione, 2004,
tecnica mista su tavola, 60 x 60 cm.

Photo SAST REPORT

Ben Ormenese, Senza titolo, 2004, tecnica mista su tavola, 60 x 60 cm.
Ben Ormenese, Senza titolo, 2004,
tecnica mista su tavola, 60 x 60 cm.

Photo SAST REPORT

It is Ben Ormenese's acquaintance with the art critic Giovanni Granzotto that seems to have brought about more exhibitions by the kinetic artist. He says he feels that with Giovanni Granzotto he was able to start his artistic career again from that point in the 1970ies, when he had still exhibited through the gallery of Silvano Falchi. In recent years Ben Ormenese has created new "strutture lamellari" and dedicated himself to three different themes, which he named: Levitazioni, Fluttuazioni and Teatrini. Common to all of these works of art is the minimalistic use of colors, usually black and white, with one or two other colors. Visual perception is the prevailing topic. Levitazioni seem to be mainly geometrical style paintings, while Fluttuazioni sometimes look like mesmerizing, puzzling, 3-D kind of landscapes, hills, valleys or surfaces in constant motion, prompting the viewer to look several times at the painting, also from different angles. Teatrini are carefully and artistically designed small "stages", composed "miniature theaters", with particular attention to lighting effects, complemented for example with plexiglass.

 

 

Ben Ormenese, Teatrino, 2004, tecnica mista su tavola, 60 x 90 cm (both artworks).
Ben Ormenese, Teatrino, 2004, tecnica mista su tavola, 60 x 90 cm (both artworks).  
Photo SAST REPORT  

 

 


 


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